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Parkinson's Disease Resources

American Parkinson's Disease Association
This web site provides information about Parkinson's Disease, the Udall Act, current events, getting involved, fellowships and grants, video rental, chapters, and information and referral center locations.

 

 

Family Caregiver Alliance
A caregiver support organization for caregivers of adults with Alzheimer's disease, stroke, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, ALS and related brain disorders.

Family Caregiver Support Network (FCSN)
A Milwaukee, Wisconsin based free resource center that helps family caregivers of older adults. A family caregiver is a spouse, child, other relative, friend or neighbor who is concerned about, helps or cares for an older adult.

The HollyRod Foundation
Founded in 1997 by NFL quarterback Rodney Peete and actress Holly Robinson Peete in honor of Holly's father, Matthew T. Robinson, Jr, the organization is dedicated to providing medical, physical and emotional support to those suffering with Parkinson's disease. The HollyRod Foundation Web site provides information about Parkinson's Disease, events, contact information and links to other resources.

Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center
The Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center (MAPC) is a National Parkinson Foundation Center of Excellence, and a wonderful resource for people with Parkinson's and their families. Their staff is committed to providing excellence in diagnosis, treatment, research and education for people with Parkinson's disease (PD) and other movement disorders.

Michigan Parkinson Foundation
Localized education and support to people with Parkinson's and related disorders, their loved ones and care partners, and the physicians and other allied health professionals who diagnose and treat those affected by the illness. Monthly Care Partner Support Group.

National Family Caregivers Association
NFCA was the first national, charitable organization dedicated to making life better for all of America's family caregivers. Provides service in the areas of information and education; support and validation; public awareness and advocacy.

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
This site contains a pamphlet written by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). NINDS, one of the US Government's 17 National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, is part of the Public Health Service within the US Department of Health and Human Services.

National Organization For Empowering Caregivers
The NOFEC is dedicated to providing assistance, education, support, respite and referrals for informal family caregivers, as well to promote public awareness about the realities of caregiving. They are committed to encouraging mutual collaboration with other organizations to serve the growing needs of family/informal caregivers.

National Parkinson Foundation
This is the web site for the NPF and has a complete menu of information on Parkinson's disease including support groups, patient services, disease information, clinical studies, a library, news, events, patient services, other links, and more.

Northwest Parkinson's Foundation
One of the most active Parkinson's organizations in the U.S. with an eye on improving the quality of life for those touched by Parkinson's Disease – patients, families and caregivers.

Parkinson's Disease Foundation
This is the web site for the Parkinson's Disease Foundation and contains information about Parkinson's disease, the foundation and an updated news area.

Parkinson's Disease Society
The stated aims of the Parkinson's Disease Society are to help people with Parkinson's disease and their families with the problems associated with the illness, to collect and disseminate information on Parkinson's disease and to encourage and provide funds for research into Parkinson's disease.

The Parkinson Alliance
The Parkinson Alliance was formed in January of 1998 with the aid of the National Parkinson's Foundation. Primarily designed for the Parkinson's disease patient with information on support groups, news, links to other PWP (people with Parkinson's) WebLink sites, jokes, political developments, and news. Informational Sites

Aging Solutions
Advice, comprehensive checklists, and links to key resources ... designed to make it easier for family caregivers to quickly find the information they need ... and avoid missing things that are important in the care of their loved one.

BioMedSearch
This is a free biomedical search site which has all of all of NIH's PubMed documents, plus many more (often in full text). People around the world have turned to the web for health and scientific information. BioMedSearch aggregates a vast number of authoritative documents in one place to make finding and sharing the right information easy, fast and free. It also has account features such as portfolios to save documents, the ability to share documents (and comment on them) between users, and keyword-based alerts.

Caregiver.com
A leading provider of information, support and guidance for family and professional caregivers. Founded in 1995, we produce Today's Caregiver magazine, the first national magazine dedicated to caregivers, the "Sharing Wisdom Caregivers Conferences", and our web site, caregiver.com which includes topic specific newsletters, online discussion lists, back issue articles of Today's Caregiver magazine, chat rooms and an online store. Caregiver Media Group and all of it's products are developed for caregivers, about caregivers and by caregivers.

Caregiver Survival Resources
Jim and Merlene Sherman draw on their 35 years of caregiver experience to write about and provide caregiving presentations and workshops. Through their site they will offer answers to caregiving questions, along with a list of resources and caregiving books.

CARE - for CareGivers of People with Parkinson's
A novel approach to providing information to caregivers. Information on this site is drawn from the messages that are posted to the CARE (Caregivers Are Really Essential) forums. This is information from people who are who are Caregivers, either directly or indirectly, of people who are living with parkinson's.

Doctor's Guide to Parkinson's Disease Information & Resources
Medical information for patients, or friends and parents of patients, diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. The site contains sections on Medical News and Alerts, Parkinson's Disease Information, Discussion Groups and Newsgroups links to other Related Sites, and a sign up to receive e-mail allowing the individual to stay abreast of Parkinson's disease developments on the Internet.

Drug Watch
The drugs used to treat Parkinson's disease, such as Mirapex, Levodopa, and Requip can have potentially harmful side effects if not monitored closely. Additionally, when these drugs are prescribed in combination with drugs for other disorders, the risks for serious illness or even death increases greatly. Drug Watch is a Web site dedicated to educating the public about the details of prescription and over-the-counter medications, as well as aiding in the protection of patients and consumers by informing them of any associated side effects.

Empowering Caregivers
A spiritual approach to Aging, Caregiving, End-Of-Life Issues. The site features: A free newsletter, frequently updated Caregiving articles, journal exercises created to help caregivers express writing about the issues that challenge tem most, a monthly spotlight on a caregiver of the Month, and a Healing Circle which promotes the power of prayer in large numbers.

Family CareGiving 101
Created by the National Family Caregivers Association and the National Alliance for Caregiving, this web site provides valuable tips to help caregivers self-identify (a critical first step) and gain resources on a variety of topics such as counseling, training, and how to navigate the healthcare maze.

Health Finder - Government Access to Libraries
Healthfinder is a free gateway to reliable consumer health and human services information developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Healthfinder can lead you to selected online publications, clearinghouses, databases, web sites, and support and self-help groups, as well as the government agencies and not-for-profit organizations that produce reliable information for the public.

InteliHealth Caregiver Zone
A great caregiver's page — providing tips, articles, coping solutions and more. InteliHealth is a joint venture of Aetna U.S. Healthcare® and Johns Hopkins University and Health System. Established in 1996, InteliHealth has become one of the leading health information companies in the world.

National Library of Medicine
The National Library of Medicine's MEDLINEplus information pages are designed to direct you to resources containing information that will help you research your health questions. They are designed for educational use only and are not intended to replace advice from a health professional.

Medicine Net
A network of U.S. board-certified physician writers and scientists providing in depth medical information for consumers through the interactive web site.

Parkinsons disease Control
Created by Healthology, this site features content created by PD thought leaders and medical experts to provide a full range of information about Parkinson's disease, current treatment options, the latest research, and more. Also, patients and their caregivers offer personal testimonials about how they are able to cope with Parkinson's disease. Parkinsons Control.com features streaming video programs with full text transcripts, which creates a fully interactive experience for anyone seeking information on Parkinson's disease.

Parkinson's Training for Caregivers
The Parkinson's Training for Caregivers project is a free online course developed to train caregivers in caring for those with Parkinson's Disease in long-term care settings.

Parkinson's Unity Walk
The Parkinson's Unity Walk is an event held in New York City in the fall of each year to increase public awareness about PD and raise funds for research.

The Parkinson's Web
A national advisory board oversees this site that includes sections titled: A Parkinson's Primer, Diagnosing Parkinson's, Medical Treatment, Mind and Body, Coping, Support Resources, Recent Research, New Publications, Bibliography, Glossary, Surgical Procedures, Massachusetts General Hospital Neurology Department, Questions, and links to other sites through the Parkinson's Disease Web. There is also a Neurology WebForum sponsored by the Massachusetts General Hospital Neurology Department.

 

Parkinson's disease Care on RemedyFind
RemedyFind is a free, unbiased site (not sponsored by drug companies etc.) where individuals can rate the effectiveness of the Parkinson s Disease treatments they have tried.

U.S. News & World Report Online Guide to Parkinson's disease
US News & World Report and Stanford University Hospital & Clinics have launched a comprehensive guide to Parkinson's disease. Topics covered include eating, exercise, sexual difficulty, sleep disturbances, and coping with depression.

Worldwide Education and Awareness for Movement Disorders
One of the Internet's most comprehensive resources for movement disorder information and the hub of movement disorder activities on the Web. The site's mission is to increase awareness of neurologic movement disorders and make early diagnosis, up-to-date treatment, and patient support a reality for all people living with movement disorders.

Senior Information

American Association of Retired Persons
A nonprofit, nonpartisan association dedicated to shaping and enriching the experience of aging for its members and for all Americans.

www.benefitscheckup.org
BenefitsCheckUp helps find programs for people ages 55 and over that may pay for some of their costs of prescription drugs, health care, utilities, and other essential items or services.

Last Acts
Last Acts is an unprecedented national effort to raise awareness of the need to improve care of the dying and to share issues and ideas at the national, state and local levels.

Guide to Retirement Living
The Guide to Retirement Living Online is the Internet version of the mid-atlantic regional publications, The Guide to Retirement Living. Each edition features a complete listing of all senior residential communities, long-term care facilities, and home care services. The Guide also features objective articles by national experts in the field of aging on issues that affect seniors, caregivers, and professionals.

MyZiva.net
MyZiva.net - The Complete Nursing Home Guide, is a free, objective and easy-to-use nursing home resource for prospective residents, caregivers and healthcare professionals. Help in finding and comparing nursing homes, nationally.

Federal Government Agencies

Health Care Financing Administration
In addition to providing health insurance, HCFA also performs a number of quality-focused activities, including regulation of laboratory testing (CLIA), surveys and certification of health care facilities (including nursing homes, home health agencies, and intermediate care facilities for the mentally retarded), development of coverage policies, and quality-of-care improvement.

Administration on Aging
In response to the growing number of older people and their diverse needs, the Older Americans Act of 1965 as Amended calls for a range of programs that offer services and opportunities for older Americans, especially those at risk of losing their independence. The Act established the Administration on Aging (AoA), an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which is headed by the Assistant Secretary for Aging in the Department.

Social Security Online
Provides information about Benefit Information Publications (retirement, survivors, disability and supplemental security income publications) and how to apply for social security retirement benefits, etc.

Medicare Info for Caregivers
Includes information on navigating throigh Medicare, healthcare services, links to partner organizations that assist caregivers, and personal caregiver anecdotes.

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
The NINDS, an agency of the U.S. Federal Government and a component of the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Public Health Service, is a lead agency for the Congressionally designated Decade of the Brain, and the leading supporter of biomedical research on disorders of the brain and nervous system.

New Medicare Prescription Coverage Information
From the Official U.S. Government Site for People with Medicare, nformation about Medicare prescription drug coverage, what it is, who can get it, when you can get it, how can you get it and why you should get it.

Miscellaneous

American Academy of Neurology
The American Academy of Neurology is a medical specialty society established to advance the art and science of neurology, and thereby promote the best possible care for patients with neurological disorders.

Brainnet.org - Central Nervous System & Brain Disorders Network
This WEB site is devoted to helping people and their caregivers better understand the clinical advances both being studied in the laboratory and those that are available now.

Center for Neurologic Study
The Center for Neurologic Study Home Page is designed to present our current activities on the WWW. CNS is a non profit organization dedicated to research and treatment of neurological diseases. The Center was founded in 1979 with the intent of helping patients and families who have been affected by presently incurable neurologic disease. To accomplish this the Center focused on experimental treatment and patient / family support and education.

Society for Neuroscience
The Society for Neuroscience is the world's largest organization of scientists and physicians dedicated to understanding the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nervous system. Neuroscientists investigate the molecular and cellular levels of the nervous system; the systems within the brain, such as vision and hearing; and behavior produced by the brain. This research provides the basis for understanding the medical fields concerned with treating nervous system disorders.

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Assistance With Paying For Medications

The Partnership for Prescription Assistance [pparx.org]
The Partnership for Prescription Assistance helps match patients who cannot afford medication to prescription assistance programs that provide free or nearly free medicines to eligible patients.

National Organization for Rare Disorders [rarediseases.org]
The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit, voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. The NORD Web site includes information on medication assistance programs and networking programs, a resource guide and links to other online resources.

Contact NORD directly:

NORD's Medication Assistance Programs
National Organization for Rare Disorders
55 Kenosia Avenue
PO Box 1968
Danbury, CT 06813-1968
Toll-free: 800-999-6673 (voicemail only)
Phone: 203-744-0100
TDD: 203-797-9590
Fax: 203-798-2291
E-mail: orphan@rarediseases.org

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Financial Aid For Medical Treatments

Information on financial aid for medical treatments can also be obtained from the following patient advocacy organizations:

Organization/E-mail Address Phone/ Fax
Families USA
[familiesusa.org]
E-mail: info@familiesusa.org
1201 New York Ave. NW
Suite 1100
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-3030
Fax: 202-347-2417
National Patient Advocate Foundation
[npaf.org]
E-mail: action@npaf.org
725 15th St. NW, Tenth Floor
Washington DC, 20005
Phone: 202-347-8009
Fax: 202-347-5579
Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs
(AMCHP) [amchp.org]
E-mail: info@amchp.org
230 M Street, NW
Suite 350
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-775-0436
Fax: 202-775-0061
Patient Advocate Foundation
[patientadvocate.org]
E-mail: help@patientadvocate.org
700 Thimble Shoals Boulevard
Suite 200
Newport News, VA 23606
Phone: 800-532-5274
Fax: 757-873-8999

Family Voices offers resources and communication opportunities on the Internet for people with cognitive and other disabilities, for their families, and for those who provide services and support. This resource has a special interest in the care of children. Resources state by state.

Family Voices [familyvoices.org]
2340 Alamo SE, Suite 102
Albuquerque, NM 87106
Toll-free: 888-835-5669
Phone: 505-872-4774
Fax: 505-872-4780
Online E-mail Contact Form: http://familyvoices.org/contact.php

Resources state by state [familyvoices.org]
Note: Special interest in children

Your child may be eligible to receive social security. To find out if your child qualifies a publication from the Social Security Administration(SSI) [ssa.gov] outlines who may qualify, and how to get this money. It also provides links to the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) in each state.

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Listing Of Clinical Trials For Panic Disorders

  • CO2 Inhalation and Risk for Panic Disorder.
    Evaluation study. Objective: To examine respiratory/physiological and subjective responding as well as genetic transmission among offspring of parents with a history of or current panic disorder (PD) diagnosis to determine whether diagnoses/symptoms, endophenotypes, or genetic profiles in offspring is differentially related to parent PD subtypes (i.e., respiratory and non-respiratory panic). Ages 9-20. Location in Bethesda, MD.
  • Evaluating the Effects of Stress in Pregnancy.
    Evaluation study. This study will evaluate pregnant women with a past or current diagnosis of depression or anxiety to gain a better understanding of how these disorders can affect an infant's development, both during and after pregnancy. Ages 18-45. Location in Atlanta, GA.

Search ClinicalTrials.gov for other NIH studies on Panic Disorder.

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Listing Of Clinical Trials For Eating Disorders

  • Testing an Alternative Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa.
    Interventional study. This study will compare a new method of treatment for bulimia nervosa (ICAT), integrative cognitive-affective therapy, to the current standard method of treatment, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Ages 18-65. Locations in Minneapolis, MN; Fargo, ND.
  • An fMRI Study of Self-regulation in Adolescents With Bulimia Nervosa.
    Evaluation study. The aim of this project is to use both functional MRI (fMRI) and behavioral measures to investigate how disturbances in frontostriatal neural systems contribute to the impulsive and habitual binge-eating behaviors in patients with Bulimia Nervosa (BN). Ages 12-21. Location in New York, NY.
  • Motivating Factors That Play a Role in Bulimia Nervosa.
    Evaluation study. This study will evaluate whether people with bulimia nervosa will binge eat in a structured laboratory setting and display behavioral patterns similar to those of individuals who are dependent on drugs. Ages 18-45. Location in New York, NY.

Search ClinicalTrials.gov for other NIH studies on Eating Disorders.

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Listing Of Clinical Trials For Depression

  • PET Whole Body Distribution Studies Using [11C]CUMI.
    Evaluation study. Background: - Researchers studying new treatments for major depressive disorder are looking at how medications to treat depression act on the brain chemical serotonin, which interacts with specific serotonin receptors on brain cells. Ages 18-65. Location in Bethesda, MD.
  • Shared Decision-Making for Elderly Depressed Primary Care Patients.
    Interventional study. Shared decision-making (SDM), in contrast to traditional medical decision-making, involves a collaborative process where patients discuss personal values and preferences and clinicians provide information to arrive at an agreed upon treatment decision. Ages 65-95. Locations in Bronx, NY; White Plains, NY.
  • fMRI Study of Treatment Changes in Major Depression.
    Interventional study. The overall purposes of this research are to determine if Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) has the same healing effect on the brain for people with depression as traditional anti-depressants do, to find out more about the causes of depression and why people differ in the extent of problems caused by depression, and to determine if certain differences in genes within populations are related to clinical symptoms. Ages 18-50. Location in St. Louis, MO.
  • Treatment for Depressed Primary Care Patients.
    Interventional study. This research study develop a collaborative depression care management model (C-DCM) that encourages collaboration between primary care physicians (PCPs) and trained social workers employed by community-based, public and nonprofit mental health clinics. Ages 60 and over. Location in White Plains, NY.
  • Depression Outcomes Study of Exercise.
    Interventional study. This pilot study may yield important research findings on how to adapt exercise treatment for depression among adolescents. Ages 12-17. Location in Golden, CO.
  • Depression Prevention for Pregnant Women on Public Assistance.
    Interventional study. This study will evaluate the effectiveness of an interpersonal therapy treatment called the Postpartum Prevention Program in preventing the development of postpartum depression in pregnant women who are financially disadvantaged. Ages 18-40. Locations in Providence, RI; Woonsocket, RI.
  • CBT for Adherence and Depression in Diabetes.
    Interventional study. This study will evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in treating people with depression and type 2 diabetes. Ages 18-80. Location in Boston, MA.
  • Evaluating the Effects of Stress in Pregnancy.
    Evaluation study. This study will evaluate pregnant women with a past or current diagnosis of depression or anxiety to gain a better understanding of how these disorders can affect an infant's development, both during and after pregnancy. Ages 18-45. Location in Atlanta, GA.
  • Identifying Factors That Predict Antidepressant Treatment Response.
    Interventional study. This study will compare different treatments for depression in order to identify which factors predict effectiveness, and will include a companion study which investigates combining treatments and long term effectiveness. Ages 18-65. Location in Atlanta, GA.
  • Group Intervention for Interpersonal Trauma.
    Interventional study. This study will assess the acceptability and effectiveness of a six-session, modular, repeating group for low-income women who have symptoms of depression and/or post-traumatic stress disorder following interpersonal trauma exposure. Ages 18-70. Location in Washington, DC.
  • Identification and Therapy of Postpartum Depression.
    Interventional study. This study will evaluate the effectiveness of a telephone-based depression screening and care management program in treating depression in postpartum women. Ages 18 and over. Location in Pittsburgh, PA.
  • Bipolar II Depression: Lithium, SSRI, or the Combination.
    Interventional study. This study will compare the safety and effectiveness of a mood stabilizing medication, an antidepressant medication, and a combination of both medications to treat symptoms of bipolar type II depression. Ages 18-65. Locations in Los Angeles, CA; Palo Alto, CA; Mason, OH.
  • Effect of Family-Based Prevention on Children of Depressed Parents.
    Interventional study. This study will test the Protecting Families Program, a 10-week prevention program for depressed parents and their pre-teenage children, by comparing the effectiveness of the program versus parent training alone. Ages 9 and over. Location in Philadelphia, PA.
  • Hormonal Causes of Menstrual-Related Mood Disorders.
    Evaluation study. This study will explore possible hormonal causes of menstrual-related mood disorders (MRMD) by stopping the menstrual cycle with a drug called Lupron and then giving in sequence two menstrual cycle hormones, progesterone and estrogen. Ages 18-50. Location in Bethesda, MD.
  • Function of Catecholamines in the Brain During Depression.
    Evaluation study. This study will explore brain function related to depressive symptoms and will examine DNA for genes that may be involved in depressive disorders, particularly genes that regulate synthesis and metabolism of the brain neurotransmitter catecholamine. Ages 18-45. Location in Bethesda, MD.
  • A Treatment Study for Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS).
    Evaluation study. This study examines the effects of estrogen and progesterone on mood, the stress response, and brain function and behavior in women with premenstrual syndrome. Ages 18-45. Location in Bethesda, MD.
  • Brain Tissue Collection for Neuropathological Studies.
    Evaluation study. The purpose of this study is to collect and study the brain tissue of deceased individuals to learn more about the nervous system and mental disorders. Locations in Washington, DC; Bethesda, MD; Fairfax, VA.
  • Evaluation of the Genetics of Bipolar Disorder.
    Evaluation study. This study looks to identify genes that may affect a person's chances of developing bipolar disorder (BP) and related conditions. Ages 18 and over. Location in Bethesda, MD.

Search ClinicalTrials.gov for other NIH studies on Depression.

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Listing Of Clinical Trials For Bipolar Disorder (Manic-Depressive Illness)

  • Sleep Disturbance and Bipolar Disorder.
    Interventional study. The study aims to evaluate a psychological intervention for individuals who suffer from sleep disturbance and bipolar disorder. Ages 18 and over. Location in Berkeley, CA.
  • Prevention of Relapse & Recurrence of Bipolar Depression.
    Interventional study. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the long-term use of combined antidepressant plus mood stabilizer therapy is superior to mood stabilizer therapy alone in preventing the relapse and recurrence of bipolar depression. Ages 18 and over. Locations in Chicago, IL; Philadelphia, PA.
  • Pediatric Bipolar Disorder Study at UCLA.
    Evaluation study. The UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience in Los Angeles, CA, is conducting a study looking at similarities and differences in how the brain works between bipolar disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Ages 7-17. Location in Los Angeles, CA.
  • Bipolar II Depression: Lithium, SSRI, or the Combination.
    Interventional study. This study will compare the safety and effectiveness of a mood stabilizing medication, an antidepressant medication, and a combination of both medications to treat symptoms of bipolar type II depression. Ages 18-65. Locations in Los Angeles, CA; Palo Alto, CA; Mason, OH.
  • Treatment of Bipolar Mania in Older Adults.
    Interventional study. This study will compare the benefits and side effects of lithium and divalproex in the treatment of older adults with bipolar mania. Ages 60 and over. Locations in Flowood, MS; White Plains, NY; Durham, NC; Cleveland, OH; Philadelphia, PA; Pittsburgh, PA; Houston, TX; Toronto, Canada.
  • Brain Tissue Collection for Neuropathological Studies.
    Evaluation study. The purpose of this study is to collect and study the brain tissue of deceased individuals to learn more about the nervous system and mental disorders. Locations in Washington, DC; Bethesda, MD; Fairfax, VA.
  • Evaluation of the Genetics of Bipolar Disorder.
    Evaluation study. This study looks to identify genes that may affect a person's chances of developing bipolar disorder (BP) and related conditions. Ages 18 and over. Location in Bethesda, MD.

Search ClinicalTrials.gov for other NIH studies on Bipolar Disorder (Manic-Depressive Illness).

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Listing Of Clinical Trials For Autism Spectrum Disorders (Pervasive Developmental Disorders)

  • Brain Imaging Study of Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorders.
    Interventional study. This research study investigates the effects of oxytocin and vasopressin on brain activity in adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Ages 18-40. Location in Bethesda, MD.
  • Cognitive Neuroscience of Autism Spectrum Disorders.
    Evaluation study. Background: - Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of developmental disorders that affect communication, social interaction, and behavior. Ages 5-89. Location in Bethesda, MD.
  • Interventions for Communication in Autism Network.
    Interventional study. The goal of this project is to compare the efficacy of two interventions for improving spoken language and reducing symptoms of autism. Ages 33 months-54 months. Locations in Los Angeles, CA; Baltimore, MD; Rochester, NY.
  • Screening for Studies on Autism Spectrum Disorders.
    Evaluation study. This study will screen children and adolescents (and their parents) to determine the child's eligibility for participation in NIMH research studies on autism spectrum disorders, such as autism and Rett's Disorder. Ages 1 year-20. Location in Bethesda, MD.
  • Long-Term Olanzapine Treatment in Children With Autism.
    Interventional study. This study will determine the short- and long-term safety and effectiveness of the drug olanzapine (Zyprexa®) for reducing symptoms of autism in children. Ages 3-12. Location in Philadelphia, PA.

Search ClinicalTrials.gov for other NIH studies on Autism Spectrum Disorders (Pervasive Developmental Disorders).

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Listing Of Clinical Trials For Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD, ADD)

  • Skills Training for Adolescents With ADHD.
    Interventional study. The proposed study will be an initial test of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for adolescents with ADHD who are receiving medication treatment. Ages 14-18. Location in Boston, MA.
  • Treatment of Severe Childhood Aggression (The TOSCA Study).
    Interventional study. This study will determine the safety and effectiveness of two medications for treating aggression in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Ages 6-12. Locations in Stony Brook, NY; Cleveland, OH; Columbus, OH; Pittsburgh, PA.
  • Brain Changes in Children and Adolescents With Behavioral Problems.
    Evaluation study. Purpose: This study will examine brain activity in children age 10-18 with disruptive behavior problems, including conduct disorder (CD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), compared with children without behavioral problems. Ages 8-18. Location in Bethesda, MD.

Search ClinicalTrials.gov for other NIH studies on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD, ADD).

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Listing Of Clinical Trials For Anxiety Disorders

Intravenous Immunoglobulin for PANDAS (Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated With Streptococcal Infections).
Interventional study. Background: - Some children experience a sudden onset of symptoms similar to those found in obsessive-compulsive disorder that may be caused by the body's reaction to an infection with streptococcal bacteria, most commonly seen as strep throat or scarlet fever. Ages 4-12. Locations in New Haven, CT; Bethesda, MD; Oklahoma City, OK.

  • PET Whole Body Distribution Studies Using [11C]CUMI.
    Evaluation study. Background: - Researchers studying new treatments for major depressive disorder are looking at how medications to treat depression act on the brain chemical serotonin, which interacts with specific serotonin receptors on brain cells. Ages 18-65. Location in Bethesda, MD.
  • Anxiety and Recurrent Abdominal Pain in Children.
    Interventional study. This study aims to determine whether citalopram is a useful, well-tolerated, and safe treatment for children and adolescents ages 7 to 18 years with functional abdominal pain. Ages 7-18. Location in Columbus, OH.
  • RCT of an Acceptance-based Behavior Therapy for GAD.
    Interventional study. The purpose of this study is to determine whether acceptance-based behavior therapy for GAD results in greater symptom reduction and increased quality of life than applied relaxation. Ages 18 and over. Location in Boston, MA.
  • Assessing Different Methods of Anxiety Care in Pediatric Settings.
    Interventional study. This study will compare the effectiveness of delivering cognitive behavioral therapy for children with anxiety disorders through in-person contact versus through workbooks and telephone communication. Ages 8-13. Location in San Diego, CA.
  • School-Based Treatment for Anxious Children.
    Interventional study. This study will determine the effectiveness of a school-based cognitive behavior therapy in urban, predominantly low-income, African-American children diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. Ages 7-17. Location in Baltimore, MD.
  • Evaluating the Effects of Stress in Pregnancy.
    Evaluation study. This study will evaluate pregnant women with a past or current diagnosis of depression or anxiety to gain a better understanding of how these disorders can affect an infant's development, both during and after pregnancy. Ages 18-45. Location in Atlanta, GA.
  • Preventing Anxiety Disorders in Youth.
    Interventional study. This study will determine the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral therapy program in preventing anxiety disorders in at-risk children. Ages 8-12. Location in Baltimore, MD.
  • The Psychobiology of Childhood Temperament.
    Evaluation study. The purpose of this study is to use brain imaging technology to examine brain changes that occur in children when they are exposed to various kinds of emotional tasks and to determine if these changes are related to the child's temperament. Ages 7-25. Locations in Bethesda, MD; College Park, MD.
  • Brain Changes in Fear.
    Evaluation study. The purpose of this study is to use brain imaging technology to investigate brain changes in people exposed to predictable versus unpredictable unpleasant stimuli. Ages 18-40. Location in Bethesda, MD.
  • Evaluation of Patients With Mood and Anxiety Disorders and Healthy Volunteers.
    Evaluation study. The purpose of this protocol is to allow for the careful screening of patients and healthy volunteers for participation in research protocols in the Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program (MAP) at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and for the collection of natural history data. Ages 3-85. Location in Bethesda, MD.
  • Brain Tissue Collection for Neuropathological Studies.
    Evaluation study. The purpose of this study is to collect and study the brain tissue of deceased individuals to learn more about the nervous system and mental disorders. Locations in Washington, DC; Bethesda, MD; Fairfax, VA.

Search ClinicalTrials.gov for other NIH studies on Anxiety Disorders.

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Information On Black Mold

What are molds?

Molds are tiny microscopic organisms that digest organic matter and reproduce by releasing spores. Molds are a type of fungi and there are over 100,000 species. In nature, mold helps decompose or break-down leaves, wood and other plant debris. Molds become a problem when they go where they are not wanted and digest materials such as our homes.

What makes molds grow in my home?

Mold enters your home as tiny spores. The spores need moisture to begin growing, digesting and destroying. Molds can grow on almost any surface, including; wood, ceiling tiles, wallpaper, paints, carpet, sheet rock, and insulation. The mold grows best when there is lots of moisture from a leaky roof, high humidity, or flood. There is no way to get rid of all molds and mold spores from your home. But you can control mold growth by keeping your home dry.

Can I be exposed to mold?

When molds are disturbed, they release spores into the air. You can be exposed by breathing air containing these mold spores. You can also be exposed through touching moldy items, eating moldy food or accidental hand to mouth contact.

Watch the "Mold in Your Home" video.

Watch the Northwest Clean Air Agency's video Mold in Your Home for mold causes, prevention, and cleanup. The video is about 12 minutes long and plays in Windows Media Viewer.

Order a free DVD of this video by calling 360-428-1617. The DVD is in English and Spanish. In addition to the mold video, the DVD also contains a video on controlling and reducing asthma triggers.

 

Do molds affect my health?

Most molds do not harm healthy people. But people who have allergies or asthma may be more sensitive to molds. Sensitive people may experience skin rash, running nose, eye irritation, cough, nasal congestion, aggravation of asthma or difficulty breathing. People with an immune suppression or underlying lung disease, may be at increased risk for infections from molds.

A small number of molds produce toxins called mycotoxins. When people are exposed to high levels of mold mycotoxins they may suffer toxic effects, including fatigue, nausea, headaches, and irritation to the lungs and eyes. If you or your family members have health problems that you suspect are caused by exposure to mold, you should consult with your physician.

When is mold a problem?

You know you have mold when you smell the "musty" odor or see small black or white specks along your damp bathroom or basement walls. Some mold is hidden growing behind wall coverings or ceiling tiles. Even dry, dead mold can cause health problems, so always take precautions when you suspect mold.

Mold is often found in areas where water has damaged building materials and furniture from flooding or plumbing leaks. Mold can also be found growing along walls where warm moist air condenses on cooler wall surfaces, such as inside cold exterior walls, behind dressers, headboards, and in closets where articles are stored against walls. Mold often grows in rooms with both high water usage and humidity, such as kitchens, bathrooms, laundry rooms, and basements. If you notice mold or know of water damaged areas in your home, it is time to take action to control its growth.

When should I sample for mold?

You don't need to sample for mold because in most cases you can see or smell mold. Even a clean, dry house will have some mold spores, but not enough to cause health problems. If you smell mold it may be hidden behind wallpaper, in the walls or ceiling, or under the carpet. If you suspect you have hidden mold be very careful when you investigate, protect yourself from exposure in the same manner as you would for a clean-up. See the chart below.

Can I control mold growth in my home?

Yes you can. Dry out the house and fix any moisture problems in your home:

  • Stop water leaks, repair leaky roofs and plumbing. Keep water away from concrete slabs and basement walls.

  • Open windows and doors to increase air flow in your home, especially along the inside of exterior walls. Use a fan if there are no windows available.

  • Make sure that warm air flows into all areas of the home. Move large objects a few inches away from the inside of exterior walls to increase air circulation.

  • Install and use exhaust fans in bathrooms, kitchens, and laundry rooms.

  • Ventilate and insulate attic and crawl spaces. Use heavy plastic to cover earth floors in crawl spaces.

  • Clean and dry water damaged carpets, clothing, bedding, and upholstered furniture within 24 to 48 hours, or consider removing and replacing damaged furnishings.

  • Vacuum and clean your home regularly to remove mold spores.

  • Check around your windows for signs of condensation and water droplets. Wipe them up right away so mold can’t start to grow.

What can I use to clean up mold?

Clean up mold and take care of the problem by following the advice above to keep your home dry and keep mold out. Act fast! Mold damages your home as it grows. Clean it up as soon as possible.

Size the Moldy Area

Decide if you have a large or small area of mold. A small area is less then about ten square feet, or a patch three feet by three feet square. To clean a small area, follow the advice below. You may use a cotton face mask for protection.

If you have a lot of mold damage (more then ten square feet) consider hiring a cleaning professional. If the moldy area has been contaminated by sewage or is in hidden places, hire a professional. To find a professional, check under "Fire and Water Damage Restoration" in your Yellow Pages. If you decide to clean up on your own, follow the guidance below.

Use Protection

Wear goggles, gloves, and breathing protection while working in the area. For large consolidated areas of mold growth, you should wear an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) approved particle mask.

Seal the Area

Seal off area from the rest of your home. Cover heat registers or ventilation ducts/grills. Open a window before you start to clean up.

Remove Items

Remove all your furnishings to a mold-free area. Clean the surrounding moldy area then follow cleaning directions below for the items you removed and the new space.

Bag Moldy Trash

Bag all moldy materials and tie off the top of the bag. Bring them outdoors and place in your garbage container right away.

Scrub Surfaces

Scrub hard surfaces:

  • First wash with a mild detergent solution, such as laundry detergent and warm water. Allow to dry.

  • (Optional step) Then wipe with a solution of 1/4 cup bleach to one gallon of water. Wait 20 minutes and repeat. Wait another 20 minutes.

  • Last apply a borate-based detergent solution and don't rinse. This will help prevent mold from growing again. A borate-based laundry or dish washer detergent has "borate" listed on the ingredients label.

Clean and Wash

Give the entire area a good cleaning, vacuum floors, and wash any exposed bedding or clothing.

Monitor

Check regularly to make sure mold has not returned to the clean-up area.

What cleans up moldy furniture?

How to clean your moldy furniture depends on how it reacts to water. See chart below:

Reaction to Water Items Recommendations
Doesn't absorb water and is washable.

Wood, metal, plastic, glass, and ceramics objects.

Wipe with a solution of lukewarm water and laundry detergent.
Absorbs water and is washable.

Clothes and bedding.

Wash in laundry.
Absorbs water but not washable.

Beds, sofas and other furniture.

These items may have to be discarded.

Or, try to save by vacuuming well and allowing to air out. If there is no odor it may be okay. Mold can come back, so watch for any mold growth or mold related health problems. Discard the item if you suspect mold is growing inside or outside the item.

Should I paint over mold?

No. Don't paint or caulk over mold. The mold will grow under the paint and the paint will peel.

Must landlords tell tenants about mold?

Yes!  In 2005, the Washington State legislature approved Senate Bill 5049 which requires landlords to notify their tenants about mold. See our resources landlords can use to comply with this mold notification requirement.

Who are my local contacts for more information about mold?

In Washington, you can contact your county health department for more information about mold. If you live outside of Washington State, try contacting your county or state health department.

Need more mold information?

  • CDC mold information has frequently asked questions, identifying mold problems and cleanup, and workplace resources.

  • EPA mold information includes resources for homeowners, schools, and building managers.

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Have A Special Day Anonymous40784

Happy Birthday Anonymous40784

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Memo From God

This is a really good memo....... I guess sometimes we forget that God will take care of things if we will let go and let him.

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Using Vinegar To Get Rid Of Gnats

A popular way to get rid of gnats using vinegar involves a small empty bottle. Fill the bottle with vinegar, almost to the top. Put the cap on securely, and poke a few holes in the cap. Gnats are attracted to the vinegar, and will climb in. Once they climb in, they won’t be able to get back out. If the gnats are in more than one spot in the house, fill up several bottles and place them where they are collecting in groups. Let these bottles sit for a few hours, then simply throw them out with the trash. Repeat the process if needed.

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Work From Home With Triond Writing Articles

Click Here For Website

How it Works

Using Triond is easy:

  1. You create original and unique content in any format.
  2. We publish your content on the most relevant website according to its topic.
  3. You get more recognition and more readership while building a portfolio and earning revenue.

It's simple; you create, we publish, you earn.

Creating Your Content

Whether you write, photograph, record or compose, you can submit your creation to Triond. We accept all original content on any topic, including written articles, pictures, audio, and video. No matter how you created it, we can publish it.

Get Published Online

Once your content is submitted and approved, we will publish it on a website within our publishing network that best suits your topic and target audience. Our network includes niche websites with topics ranging from poetry and literature, to business, sports, travel, health and wellness, and many more.

You can easily keep track of all of your published items in your Triond account. You can even personalize your profile page to transform it into a unique, sharable portfolio that rivals any blog.

Readership, Recognition, and Revenue

There are a number of technical and financial challenges that individuals face when trying to make online publishing worth their while. With Triond, you can just focus on what you do best – create! We handle the technical, marketing, operational and financial details so you don’t have to.

Triond helps showcase your content so your work gets maximum readership and you earn recognition. As soon as your content is published, it begins generating revenue from several income sources, such as display and contextual advertising that appears on the pages of your content. We share with you 50% of the revenue generated by your content.

Payments are made monthly on the 15th of the month for earnings you have accumulated up until the end of the previous month. You can receive your payment by PayPal, check or Western Union money transfer.

Start publishing now!

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Osteoporosis Resources

Patient Advocate Foundation's Co-Pay Relief (CPR)
The CPR program provides co-payment assistance to insured Americans who financially and medically qualify. Click here to start your application

Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF)
PAF is a national 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization which provides professional case management services to Americans with chronic, life threatening and debilitating illnesses. Click here to seek assistance from a case manager

 

Osteoporosis Resources and Programs

The Patient Advocate Foundation's (PAF) Co-Pay Relief (CPR) Program does not review the information contained on the website links provided for content, accuracy or completeness. Use of and access to this information is subject to the terms, limitations and conditions as outlined on the accessed websites.

PAF Co-Pay Relief Program makes no representation as to the accuracy or any other aspect of the information contained on any website accessed from the CPR website, nor does PAF Co-Pay Relief Program necessarily endorse the website information provided.

The information presented on the PAF Co-Pay Relief website is provided for general information only and is not intended as a substitute for medical care. Please talk with your healthcare provider about any information you acquire from this or any other website accessed through the PAF Co-Pay Relief program website.

National Osteoporosis Foundation
Phone: 800-231-4222
www.nof.org

American Osteopathic Association
Phone: 800-621-1773
www.osteopathic.org

American Academy of Nurse Practitioners
Phone: 512-442-4262
www.aanp.org

American College of Rheumatology
Phone: 404-633-3777
www.rheumatology.org

American Bone Health
Phone: 888-266-3015
www.americanbonehealth.org


Other Resources and Programs

Patient Advocate Foundation's National Underinsured Resource Directory
www.patientadvocate.org/help4u.php

Clinical Trials
www.clinicaltrials.gov

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Children's Cancer Resources and Programs

America's Baby Cancer Foundation
Phone: 714-655- 4431
www.babycancer.com

Children's Brain Tumor Foundation
Phone: 866-228-4673
www.cbtf.org

Foundation for Children with Cancer
Phone: 314-843-9300
www.childrenwithcancer.org

Jake Owen Raborn Foundation
Phone: 888-356-5253
www.jakesfoundation.org

The National Children's Cancer Society
Phone: 800-532-6459
www.nationalchildrenscancersociety.org

Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation
Phone: 800-253-6530
www.pbtfus.org

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Autoimmune Disorders Resources

Patient Advocate Foundation's Co-Pay Relief (CPR)
The CPR program provides co-payment assistance to insured Americans who financially and medically qualify. Click here to start your application

Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF)
PAF is a national 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization which provides professional case management services to Americans with chronic, life threatening and debilitating illnesses. Click here to seek assistance from a case manager

 

Autoimmune Disorders Resources and Programs

The Patient Advocate Foundation's (PAF) Co-Pay Relief (CPR) Program does not review the information contained on the website links provided for content, accuracy or completeness. Use of and access to this information is subject to the terms, limitations and conditions as outlined on the accessed websites.

PAF Co-Pay Relief Program makes no representation as to the accuracy or any other aspect of the information contained on any website accessed from the CPR website, nor does PAF Co-Pay Relief Program necessarily endorse the website information provided.

The information presented on the PAF Co-Pay Relief website is provided for general information only and is not intended as a substitute for medical care. Please talk with your healthcare provider about any information you acquire from this or any other website accessed through the PAF Co-Pay Relief program website.

American Autoimmune Related Disease Association, Inc.
Phone: 800-598-4668
www.aarda.org


Other Resources and Programs

Patient Advocate Foundation's National Underinsured Resource Directory
www.patientadvocate.org/help4u.php

Clinical Trials
www.clinicaltrials.gov

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Minnesota Guide to Additional Health Care Resources For Seniors And Low Income

Senior Information

Medicare Issues Hotline
1-800-633-4227

This federal government Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services hotline has information on Medicare insurance supplements, claims, general information on Medicare, and Medicare fraud and abuse.

Minnesota Board on Aging
(651) 431-2500 or 1-800-882-6262

The Minnesota Board on Aging develops, coordinates, evaluates, and administers federal and state funds for the aging, makes grants to 7 area agencies on aging and to nonprofit agencies, and serves as an advocate for older persons. The Board partners with many other groups to provide the web site www.MinnesotaHelp.info. This lists community resources, including services for seniors, as well as caregivers and persons with disabilities. In addition, the Board publishes "Health Care Choices for Minnesotans on Medicare." This booklet provides a wide variety of information useful to seniors including listing all the plans that can supplement Medicare in Minnesota and each plan's coverage. It is on the Minnesota Board on Aging web site. Free copies are available from the Senior LinkAge Line® at 1-800-333-2433.

Social Security Administration
1-800-772-1213

Provides public information materials about the Social Security Administration and supplemental security programs, as well as information on eligibility for Medicare. Free pamphlets on Social Security disability benefits and supplemental security income are available through this line.

Senior LinkAge Line® 1-800-333-2433
The Senior LinkAge Line® is a nonprofit telephone and referral service which is free to seniors and their families. Seniors unsure of where to call with a health insurance or Medicare-related question are encouraged to call the Senior LinkAge Line®. Questions can also be e-mailed to senior.linkage@state.mn.us. They also help seniors and others locate lower cost prescription drugs through a service called RX Connect. Phones are answered from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

 

Free or Reduced Cost Health Care

Assured Access (formerly Assured Care)
(612) 348-6141

Assured Access is a Hennepin County program available to Hennepin County residents who do not qualify for other public programs. There are eligibility requirements. Members receive a discount on bills for health care services provided by certain clinics. There is no cost to enroll and no monthly premium.

Children's Defense Fund - Minnesota
(651) 227-6121

The Children's Defense Fund - Minnesota has compiled a Minnesota Low-Cost Health Care Directory to help uninsured or poorly insured families with children understand some of their health care options. Clinics are listed by county. Many of the listed clinics provide service to adults as well.

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services, metro area
(651) 297-1316 or TTY 888-206-6513

Their booklet "Financial Resources for Hearing Aids" lists organizations to contact for lower cost or free hearing aids/and or assistive listening devices. There are eligibility requirements. Other helpful publications are also available. Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services is part of the Minnesota Department of Human Services.

Essential Community Providers
These clinics provide care to high-risk and special needs individuals and to individuals with limited access to health care services. Patients pay based on a sliding fee scale. The Minestoa Department of Health, Managed Care Systems Section web site maintains a list of these clinics.

Mid-Minnesota Family Medicine Center
(320) 240-3157 or 1-800-575-2982

The Mid-Minnesota Family Medicine Center clinic is located in St. Cloud but offers health services on a sliding fee scale basis to anyone who does not have health insurance. Appointments are required and clients must bring proof of income.

Migrant Health Service, Inc.
(218) 236-6502 or 1-800-842-8693

There are seven health centers and two mobile units that offer low-cost health care on a sliding fee scale during the summer months to farm workers in certain counties. They also have programs to assist victims of abuse. The Grafton, Moorhead, Rochester, and Wilmar clinics are open all year.

Minnesota Department of Health
(651) 201-5414 or 1-877-676-5414

The Refugee Health Program provides a directory of "Health Resources Serving Diverse Cultural Communities." The directory lists by counties resources for health and dental services, mental health, home care, services for battered women and those sexually assaulted, and some social services. Many of these resources provide services at a lower cost and are available to refugees and others. The counties currently listed are: Anoka, Carver, Dakota, Hennepin, Kandiyohi, Olmsted, Otter Tail, Ramsey, Rice, Scott, Stearns, and Washington. Call (651) 201-5414 for a printed copy of the directory.

Neighborhood Health Care Network (formerly known as Community Clinic Consortium)
(651) 489-2273 or 1-866-489-4899
The Neighborhood Health Care Network is an alliance of community clinics in the Twin Cities and surrounding areas. Network members provide a wide range of services including primary/preventive services, prenatal care, reproductive services, and dental care. Check to see whether the clinic offers a sliding fee scale, offers a fee payment schedule, and accepts public assistance, MinnesotaCare® and other private insurance plans. Hours are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Portico Healthnet (formerly Metro East Health Program)
(651) 603-5100
Portico Healthnet is for residents of Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey and Washington counties who don't qualify for other public programs. For $25 to $50 a month (depending on household size and income) all covered health care services are paid. Hospital, emergency room, and dental are not covered. There may be a waiting list to join.

Sage Screening Program (formerly the Minnesota Breast and Cervical Cancer Control Program) 1-888-643-2584
The Sage Screening Program provides free breast and cervical cancer screening and free or low-cost colposcopies to Minnesota women age 40 and over who are uninsured or underinsured and who meet income eligibility. Services are provided at participating facilities.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration
Federal Community Health Centers provide preventive and primary care health services. They serve "populations with limited access to health care. These include low income populations, the uninsured, those with limited English proficiency, migrant and seasonal farmworkers, individuals and families experiencing homelessness, and those livingin public housing." Services are provided on a sliding fee scale. To find a health center near you, click on Get Health Care on the web site and enter your zip code.

United Way 211 - First Call for Help
Use this number to reach your local First Call for Help: 211 or 1-800-543-7709

Please note that 211 works from many but not all cell phones.
United Way 211, formerly United Way - First Call for Help, is a community answer line that provides you with information about, and refers you to, individual and family services. Trained volunteers can give you information on health services, health issues, counseling, child care, legal help, and more. The phone line is answered 24 hours a day. You can download their database to your computer or to a CD and conduct your own search also.

 

Lower Cost Dental Services

Contact these organizations to locate lower cost dental care in your area.

Minnesota Dental Association
(612) 767-8400 or 1-800-950-3368

Minneapolis District Dental Society
(651) 631-9845

St. Paul District Dental Society
(651) 697-0831

Neighborhood Health Care Network
(651) 489-2273 or 1-866-489-4899

Some of the Neighborhood Health Care Network member clinics provide dental care. Check to see whether the clinic has a sliding fee scale and accepts public assistance and MinnesotaCare® or other private insurance plans.

University of Minnesota Dental Clinic
(612) 625-2495

Supervised dental work at the University of Minnesota Dental Clinic is done by students in their last two years of dental school. For orthodontic work call (612) 625-6444. Supervised orthodontic work is done by residents who have finished their dentistry schooling and are now specializing in orthodontics.

 

Health Care for Children with Disabilities

TEFRA
As a component of Medical Assistance, TEFRA helps families cover health care costs for their severely disabled children who would otherwise require institutional-level care. Eligibility is based on the child's income, assets, and level of disability, and other requirements. Eligibility is not based on the parent's income or assets. Contact your county human service agency for more information. A list of county agencies can be found in the "Guide to Minnesota's Public Health Care Programs" or call the Minnesota Health Information Clearinghouse 651 201-5178 or 1-800-657-3793.

Minnesota Children with Special Health Needs
(651) 201-3650 or 1-800-728-5420

The Minnesota Children with Special Health Needs section of the Minnesota Department of Health is a referral resource for Minnesota families with children under 21 who have disabling or potentially disabling conditions or chronic illnesses.

Shriners Hospital for Children - Twin Cities
(612) 596-6100
The Shriners Twin Cities Unit provides care to children with neuromusculoskeletal conditions who live in Minnesota and some surrounding states and Canadian provinces. The only criterion for admission is that the child has a treatable orthopedic condition. All care provided at or authorized by the hospital is provided at no charge to patients, parents, third party payers, or governmental agencies.

 

General Insurance Information

Minnesota Department of Commerce
(651) 296-4026 or 1-800-657-3602

The Minnesota Department of Commerce regulates insurance companies and insurance agents. They do not regulate Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs). This department answers questions and addresses complaints about the companies it regulates.

Minnesota Department of Health
(651) 201-5100 or 1-800-657-3916

The Managed Care Systems section of the Minnesota Department of Health regulates Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs). This department answers questions and addresses complaints about the companies it regulates.

www.minnesotahealthinfo.org
This web site provides information on buying health coverage, on comparing the cost and quality of health plans, doctors, hospitals and nursing homes, information on assuring quality care, and on a wide variety of other health care related information.

Agency for Health Care Policy and Research
1-800-358-9295

The federal Agency for Health Care Policy and Research publications cover topics such as medical treatment effectiveness, health care costs and utilization, health care expenditures, health information systems, health technology assessment, clinical practice guidelines, and funding opportunities for grants and contracts. Single copies of publications are available free upon request from the agency.

America's Health Insurance Plans (formerly Health Insurance Association of America)
1-202-778-3200

The America's Health Insurance Plans association publishes a variety of consumer guidebooks on topics such as health insurance, long-term care, and Medicare supplements.

Health Insurance Counseling Program
1-800-333-2433

The Health Insurance Counseling Program for seniors provides information, counseling, and public education about health insurance. It is Minnesota's State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP).

Minnesota Insurance HelpLine
The Insurance HelpLine provides general information on insurance, insurance companies, and suggestions on how to go about finding insurance coverage. Contact them through the Insurance Federation of Minnesota. Click on the Insurance HelpLine link on the left side of the page and leave an e-mail asking your questions.

National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions
(703) 684-1355

The National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions provides information on children's hospitals and what to consider when a child will be hospitalized. Click on About Us, About Children's Hospitals, Acts and Trends for A Parent's Guide to Choosing Hospital Care for Children.

National Association of Insurance Commissioners
The National Association of Insurance Commissioners web site provides information about different types of insurance including health insurance. See "Consumers" for general health insurance information and see "Insure U Get Smart about Insurance" to see information in "Life Situations - Tips and Information." The Association also publishes booklets on insurance including Medigap and long-term care. To request one free copy of "Choosing a Medigap Policy" and "A Shopper's Guide to Long-Term Care Insurance" call the order line at 816-783-8300 or order on line.

National Health Information Center, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
1-800-336-4797

The National Health Information Center is a health information referral service which locates organizations as resources for health professionals and consumers who have health-related questions. Also see www.healthfinder.gov for publications, health information, healthy living and prevention information, and lists of toll-free numbers to organizations that provide health-related information, education and support. The database for publications lists thousands of on-line federal health publications. The NHIC is also accessible via e-mail at: info@nhic.org.

 

Prescription Drugs

RxConnect
1-800-333-2433
RxConnect is a service that helps Minnesota residents find programs that provide free or discounted prescription drugs. Most of these programs have income and eligibility requirements. Applications are provided. The service is available to all ages and is provided by the Minnesota Board on Aging through the Senior LinkAge Line®.

Minnesota RxConnect
Minnesota RxConnect is the state of Minnesota web site which helps Minnesotans make informed decisions regarding accessing lower cost prescription drugs locally. Minnesota RxPrice Compare shows the local Minnesota price of 400 drugs. Consumers can search for their prescription drugs by city, county or zip code. It lists the drugs that are available and their prices. The site includes general safety and savings tips when using and purchasing prescription drugs. As of March 1, 2010 the MinnesotaRxConnect site will no longer provide a way to order from Canadian pharmacies as demand for this service has diminished. See their site for additional information.

Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit (Part D)
On January 1, 2006, Medicare began offering a drug benefit. Contact the Senior LinkAge Line at 1-800-333-2433 or Medicare at 1-800-633-4227 (TTY: 1-877-486-2048) for questions about Medicare Part D. The Minnesota Board on Aging and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services provide updates on this benefit. Certain enrollees are eligible for a partial or full subsidy to help pay for this drug benefit. This subsidy is sometimes referred to as the "Low Income Subsidy" or "Extra Help."

Patient Assistance Programs
Many pharmaceutical companies provide reduced price or free drugs to eligible people. Two examples of Internet sites to use to look up information about patient assistance programs are www.rxassist.org and www.needymeds.com. You can check to see if your prescription drugs are available at a lower cost and if you are eligible for the programs. On the NeedyMeds web site, click on Generic Name List, or Brand Name List, or Company List to see if your drug is listed and for information about the specific prescription assistance programs. Most of the prescription assistance programs have eligibility requirements. Both of these sites also provide other helpful information regarding getting prescription drugs.

Additional prescription drug resources and information are available in the publication "Low Cost Options for Prescription Drugs" available through the Minnesota Health Information Clearinghouse, Minnesota Department of Health, (651) 201-5178 or 1-800-657-3793.

Small Employer Information

A print copy of "Guide to the Small Employer Health Benefit Plan Market" is available through the Minnesota Health Information Clearinghouse, (651) 201-5178 or 1-800-697-3793. The guide provides answers to initial questions small employers have about the small employer health plan market. It lists companies that are licensed to sell health coverage to small employers in Minnesota.

 


For more information contact the Minnesota Health Information Clearinghouse:

By telephone:
(651) 201-5178 or 1-800-657-3793
TDD: (651) 201-5797

By mail:
Minnesota Department of Health
Minnesota Health Information Clearinghouse
Compliance Monitoring Division
85 East Seventh Place, P.O. Box 64882
St. Paul, Minnesota 55164-0882

By e-mail:
health.clearinghouse@state.mn.us

By fax:
(651) 201-5186

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Texas WIC Program For New Mothers

Texas WIC logo

WIC — Women, Infants and Children Program

 

New Foods Package

WIC is a nutrition program that helps pregnant women, new mothers, and young children eat well, learn about nutrition, and stay healthy. Nutrition education and counseling, nutritious foods, and help accessing health care are provided to low-income women, infants, and children through the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program, popularly known as WIC.

Click here for information about WIC Eligibility Requirements.

Click here to find your closest WIC clinic.

Click here for information about the New WIC Food Packages.

For information on how to apply for WIC
Call (toll free): 1 (800) 942-3678 

WIC Eligibility

Who is eligible and who can apply?

  • Pregnant women
  • Women who are breastfeeding a baby under 1 year of age
  • Women who have had a baby in the past six months
  • Parents, step-parents, guardians, and foster parents of infants and children under the age of 5 can apply for their children

If you have a job or if you have private health insurance, you can still apply for WIC. You do not have to be married to apply for WIC.

For more eligibility requirements, see below.

What about fathers?

Fathers of children under the age of 5 are encouraged to enroll their children in the WIC program. Just like any other parent or guardian, fathers can bring their children to appointments, attend nutrition classes, and receive and redeem benefits for their children. Active participation by fathers is a great help in keeping WIC children healthy.

Are services free?

  • Yes! All WIC services are free to those who are eligible.

Who provides the services?

  • The Department of State Health Services runs the Texas WIC program and provides funds to agencies across the state who run local WIC offices. All kinds of agencies offer WIC services such as local health departments, county and city agencies, migrant health centers, community action agencies, and hospitals.
  • Many local offices are open in the evenings and on Saturdays so that clients do not have to miss work.
  • There are over 300 full-time, permanent WIC offices and more than 200 other part-time satellite sites, so finding a WIC clinic close to you shouldn't be a problem. Click here to find your closest WIC clinic.

Eligibility Requirements

  • Meet the income guidelines. Households with incomes at or below 185 percent of the federal poverty income level are eligible. WIC determines income based on gross income. WIC counts all of the members of a household, related or unrelated. WIC counts an unborn baby as a household member. Click to view Income Eligibility Guidelines (45K, PDF) viewing information .
  • Be at nutritional risk. WIC clients receive an initial health and diet screening at a WIC clinic to determine nutritional risk. WIC uses two main categories of nutritional risk: (1) medically-based risks such as a history of poor pregnancy outcome, underweight status, or iron-deficiency anemia, and (2) diet-based risks such as poor eating habits that can lead to poor nutritional and health status. Clients will be counseled at WIC about these risks and the outcome influenced by nutrition education and nutritious foods provided by WIC.
  • Live in Texas. WIC clients usually receive services in the county where they live. U.S. citizenship is not a requirement for eligibility.
  • Clients must apply in person except in certain limited cases.

How to Become a WIC Client:

  • Are you a pregnant woman, breastfeeding a baby less than one year of age, a postpartum woman (one who had a baby within the last six months), or have an infant or a child who is less than 5 years old? If yes, call 1 (800) WIC-FORU [1 (800) 942-3678] Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. to obtain the telephone number and address of a WIC clinic that is close to where you live.
  • Call or go by the clinic to make an appointment for a pregnant woman, breastfeeding woman, postpartum woman, infant, or child less than 5 years of age.
  • At the time of your appointment, bring documentation of your household's source of income or wages. This applies to all members of the household. Some examples of documentation include a paycheck stub, a current tax return, a letter from an employer, a Social Security check, a child-support check, or self-employed accounting records. Applicants and certain family members who receive Medicaid, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, or Food Stamps automatically meet income eligibility by bringing acceptable proof of their participation in one of these programs—they do not have to bring other income documents.
  • At the time of your appointment, bring documentation of where you live with your current physical address, such as a utility or credit-card bill, rent receipt, or business letter.
  • At the time of your appointment, bring one document of identification for each person applying for WIC benefits and the adult responsible for the benefits. Examples of acceptable identification documents are a birth certificate, a driver's license, an immunization card, an employee or school identification card with picture, a Social Security card, or hospital records.
  • During the appointment the applicant will undergo a simple health screen including height and weight measurement, a finger stick to screen for low iron, a medical and health history and a diet recall and history to determine nutritional risk.
  • At the end of his or her appointment, an applicant will receive counseling and referral to appropriate health and human services, if applicable. WIC Program eligibility will also be determined. Food benefits will be provided to those eligible.
  • If you have any questions about the above information, lack some item above, or have a special situation, call or go by the clinic before your appointment so the staff may assist you with your situation. Not bringing in all the documentation at the time of your appointment may delay eligibility determination and benefits. A complete screen must be done before eligibility can be determined.

What does WIC provide and who receives the benefits?

WIC provides nutrition education, nutritious foods, referrals to health and human services, breastfeeding support, and immunizations (at some clinics). Food benefits are issued for each client. Both fathers and mothers can receive and spend the benefits for their children.


WIC Nutrition Education

Clients receive individual nutrition counseling and nutrition classes. Many clinics offer classes especially for children. Men who have family members participating in the program are welcome to attend nutrition classes.

Some of the topics clients can learn about:

  • Eating healthfully during pregnancy for mom and baby
  • Infant and child nutrition — healthy foods for happy children, picky eaters, watching your child’s weight, and lots more
  • How to get the most out of their food dollars
  • Valuable parenting skills
  • Stages of child development
  • The importance of childhood immunizations
  • Tips for pregnant teens
  • Common infant problems, such as colic, constipation, and crying

Breastfeeding Support

Clients receive encouragement and instruction in breastfeeding. In many cases, breastfeeding women are provided breast pumps free of charge. WIC helps clients learn why breastfeeding is the best start for their baby, how to breastfeed while still working, Dad’s role in supporting breastfeeding, tips for teens who breastfeed, how to pump and store breastmilk, and much more.

Nutritious Foods

WIC provides benefits each month which are taken to grocery stores and used to buy nutritious foods. WIC foods include iron-fortified infant formula and infant cereal, iron-fortified adult cereal, vitamin C–rich fruit and vegetable juice, milk, eggs, cheese, beans, and peanut butter. Different food packages are issued to different clients. For example, mothers who are totally breastfeeding their babies without formula are issued tuna and carrots in addition to other foods.

Referrals

WIC refers clients to a variety of health and social services agencies and programs. WIC staff can help clients find these services. Some examples are:

  • Medicaid
  • Food Stamps
  • Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF)
  • Child health insurance
  • Family planning
  • Migrant health services
  • Prenatal care
  • Texas Health Steps (EPSDT)
  • Medical and dental services
  • Early Childhood Intervention (ECI)
  • The School Lunch / Breakfast Summer Lunch Program
  • Food Pantries
  • Literacy Services
  • Job Banks
  • Housing Services
  • Parenting Classes
  • Drug and alcohol abuse programs
  • Child care
  • Child support enforcement


Immunizations

Many Texas WIC clinics provide immunizations free of charge to WIC clients. Those clinics that do not provide immunizations will check immunization records and make referrals to clinics where shots are given.

Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program

Some WIC clinics also provide vouchers for clients to shop at farmers’ markets to buy fresh vegetables and fruits — usually during the spring and summer months. This service is not available statewide, due to limited funding.

Health Benefits of WIC

Studies show that WIC plays an important role in improving birth outcomes and containing health-care costs. WIC has a positive impact on children’s diets. WIC improves infant-feeding practices by actively promoting breastfeeding as the best method of feeding infants. WIC clients have improved rates of childhood immunizations and a regular source of health care.

  • Improved infant-feeding practices
  • Premature births reduced
  • Fetal death rate reduced
  • Low birthweight reduced
  • Long-term medical expenses reduced
  • Improved dietary intake
  • Improved cognitive development
  • Fewer premature births

Eligibility Forms:

Income Questionnaire (English) (216, PDF) viewing information

Income Questionnarie (Spanish) (165, PDF) viewing information

Income Questionnarie (Vietnamese) (281, PDF) viewing information

What to Bring to Your WIC Appointment (English/Spanish) (109K, PDF) viewing information

What to Bring to Your WIC Appointment (Vietnamese) (173K, PDF) viewing information

Family Certification Form (WIC-35) (156K, PDF) viewing information

Supplemental Information Forms (WIC-35-1) (English) (125K, PDF) viewing information

Supplemental Information Forms (WIC-35-1A) (Spanish) (129K, PDF) viewing information- Spanish

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